Water Travel for Business

The Port of Rosyth is Scotland’s largest freight port and is well connected to the road and rail network.

Fife is a peninsula, surrounded by the sea to the north, east and south. The sea has helped shape the landscape, economy and social and cultural fabric of Fife.

Shipbuilding is a huge part of Fife's history at Burntisland, Methil and Rosyth and the engineering specialisms are now growing in areas such as renewable energies.

Ports

The ports in Fife handle freight and associated logistics in Scotland. The excellent road and rail links mean freight is handled and distributed efficiently.

With a riverside location, the Port of Rosyth offers businesses the import of raw materials and the export of finished goods. It is eight miles from Edinburgh and close to the Forth Road and Rail Bridge. Its location means it is well situated for the main North Sea shipping lanes and oil and gas fields. Investment is coming into the area due, in part, to the success of the port. An £80m business park is under construction, a road link to the nearby M90 is being built as well as a new Forth crossing, and offices are being planned.

The Port of Methil specialises as a woodpulp and timber distribution centre and these contribute most of its traffic. Other commodities include dry bulk, fertiliser imports, road salt in winter, and export stone and coal are handled here.

Situated in a developing area of Fife, the Port of Burntisland is on the north side of the Forth, close to road and rail links.

Recently reopened for the importation of wheat to a quayside tenant, the Port of Kirkcaldy is a modern example of coastal shipping in action. It is on the north side of the Firth of Forth.

 

Tidal Times

Whether you're thinking about coming to Fife by boat, or walking parts of the coastal path, make sure you know the tidal times in Fife. Click on the area below to find out the tidal times. 

Burntisland

Rosyth

Kirkcaldy

Methil

Anstruther

Newburgh

Kincardine

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